Sunday, October 13, 2013

Make Me Normal: An autism documentary neurodiversity does not want you to see

Amidst the torrent of pro-neurodiversity film documentaries such as Loving Lamp posts, neurotypical, etc.I've found a figurative diamond in the rough.  A very interesting documentary about teens with autism and asperger's made in Britain called "Make Me Normal" 

In this documentary, the kids express how much they dislike their autism and express a desire not to be autistic.  What would Ari Ne'eman who constantly uses the royal we think of this?  What would Alex Plank who states that autism equals good and that most autistics don't want to be cured think of this? 

Glad to have found this one, was interesting.  Neurodiversity may have to improve their polling techniques. 


6 comments:

Anonymous said...

You're out of touch.

Alex Plank supports Neurodiversity? That's a fig leaf. He's given toys by A$ to help in their agenda.

You blame so much on 'autism' you've disconnected from reality.


I am sure you read the title and saw no further, judging by how you co-opted it for your agenda.

jonathan said...


I am sure you read the title and saw no further, judging by how you co-opted it for your agenda.

Nope, I watched it from beginning to end and I was absolutely enthralled. It was incredibly moving and showed an absolutely genuine picture of autism.

I recommend you watch it if you haven't done so already, then maybe you'll come to your senses and abandon your pro-neurodiversity beliefs.

suburpcomix said...

i will word this cautiously, as your blog's tagline makes me think you have a pretty formed and unalterable opinion what or who 'neurodiversity' actually stands for.
i have watched the whole documentary.
i thought it was interesting.
not so much in where learning about autism and the way kids can be affected by it is concerned, but rather for the window into what can only be considered one approach of education of autistic kids among many others.
I am not fully comfortable with the way the documentary was presented (mise en scene) but I understand the message is about the 'sufferings' you also seem to be focused on. I do not believe pulling these children out of mainstream schools and putting them all together in an 'autism school' is the most appropriate way to help them cope with a non-autistic world either.
I am not one to see the autism as my child as a gift. But I see many dangers in the rejection of it, and I am not surprised that autistics are advocating for their right to existence, their right to be how and who they are.
What I do not understand is how you could watch and recommend this documentary solely through your filter of your rejection of the - very broadly used and not fully defined - idea of neurodiversity.
How productive is your fight ?
For who ?

jonathan said...

I recommend the documentary independent of my point of view of neurodiversity. I thought it was interesting and informative and gave a good message that countered the "autism is beautiful" claptrap. I identified with the kids in the documentary as I was a special education student for eight years and I knew what it was like to be segregated and not part of the so-called "normal" world.

I don't know how productive my fight is, I don't care about that. It is for all of us who suffer from being involved with orhaving a developmental disability.

suburpcomix said...

"I recommend the documentary independent of my point of view of neurodiversity"
No, I don't think you do, given the title of the blogpost.
your assumption is that the reaction to this documentary is 'omg how much they suffer' and this may be true to some extent, but my personal impression, as I said, is that this type of 'school ghetto' for kids with a particular group of disabilities is NOT the way we should approach their education.
I see you are particularly hung up on the argument that some (!) neurodiversity advocates want to talk away the immense disability autism can represent by painting a colourful happy picture that talks of mere diversity.
but while i can follow you that this may be hard to understand for the parents of children on the severe end of the spectrum that face a lot of physical handicaps and are very dependant, i do not understand the fervour of your fight and the anger towards these advocates as what they are really demanding is to focus on 'inclusion', here and now, rather than just seeking for a cure, for the future...
furthermore, all the well-meaning educators in the video were displaying several behaviours that would not only enforce but trigger meltdowns in autistic kids according to my personal experience. I am not actually, but if I WAS a neurodiversity advocate, this video can be very well seen as an example on how UNHAPPY the segregation of disabled children, that DO have possibilities for academic learning, actually makes them.
I get the impression you are a person capable of a certain analysis and reflection. I have yet to understand how you could possibly have accumulated so much hatred against the one part of the "autism community" (which is an illusion in my eyes, because so many approaches are different) that is the one that pushes mostly for tolerance, integration, inclusion. I just don't get it.

Anonymous said...

Youtube removed it. I wonder why!